A comparison of horatian and juvenalian satire in literature

English Definitions Satire--Literary art of diminishing a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking toward it attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn or indignation. Takes its form from the genre it spoofs.

A comparison of horatian and juvenalian satire in literature

Satire Examples

Satire Definition What is satire? Satire is the use of humor, irony, sarcasm, or ridicule to criticize something or someone. Public figures, such as politicians, are often the subject of satire, but satirists can take aim at other targets as well—from societal conventions to government policies.

Satire is an entertaining form of social commentary, and it occurs in many forms: Some additional key details about satire: Satire is a bit unusual as a literary term because it can be used to describe both a literary device and the specific genre of literature that makes use of the device.

Just like a comedy is comedic because it uses comedy, a satire is satirical because it uses satire. For most of this entry, the word "satire" will be used refer to the device, not the genre.

A comparison of horatian and juvenalian satire in literature

Satire often coincides with the use of other literary devices, such as ironymalapropism, overstatement, understatementjuxtapositionor parody. Though most satires seek to draw laughter, there are many unfunny or even dark examples of satire, such as George Orwell's Animal Farm or Bret Easton Ellis's American Psychowhich criticize communist societies and capitalist societies, respectively.

How to Pronounce Satire Here's how to pronounce satire: Satire as Genre There are many novels, plays, and other works of literature that fall into the genre of satire.

These works are all characterized by their consistent and sustained satirical attacks on their various targets. For instance, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn satirizes the hypocrisies of pre-Civil-War society in the American South, especially its traditions of racism and slavery.

But satire is not only found in literature that falls into the broader genre of satire. To the contrary, satire is a device that can be used in many types of writing and art. For instance, a production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar in New York City came under criticism for costuming Caesar who gets assassinated in the play in a business suit and bright red tie that closely resembled the standard garb of President Donald Trump.

While the play Julius Caesar is not itself a satire, this costuming decision added an element of satire to the play, since it equated the despotic almost-Roman-emperor with an American president whom some have criticized as having tyrannical impulses of his own.

Satire and Humor Satirists use humor not only to to ridicule their subjects, but also to gain the attention and trust of their readers. While readers might not always respond to a highly-conceptual, nuanced argument for change laid out in a dense manifesto or academic essay, they can easily and enjoyably recognize societal problems targeted by satirical writing.

Some scholars have argued that the popular appeal of satire helps in bringing about actual social reform, since the use of humor makes it easier to disseminate political and societal critiques more widely. However, humor is not a required element of satire. George Orwell's Animal Farm is one of the more famous satires ever written, but few people find humor in it—and in fact, many people find it to be a deeply unsettling and not-at-all funny book.

Horatian Satire is lighthearted and gentle. It is the type of satire that is supposed to evoke a smile. Juvenalian Satire, on the other hand, is . Satire--Literary art of diminishing a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking toward it attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn or indignation. Takes its form from the genre it spoofs. Horatian satire--After the Roman satirist Horace: Satire in which the voice is indulgent, tolerant, amused, and witty. The speaker holds up to gentle ridicule the absurdities and follies of human beings, aiming at producing in . Juvenalian satire, named for the writings of the Roman satirist Juvenal (late first century – early second century AD), is more contemptuous and abrasive than the Horatian. Juvenal disagreed with the opinions of the public figures and institutions of the Republic and actively attacked them through his literature.

Types of Satire Traditionally, scholars have divided satire into two main categories: Horatian and Juvenalian satire. These labels are derived from the names of the renowned Roman satirists Horace and Juvenal, who originated each type.

A third, less common type of satire is Menippean satire, named after Menippus, the Greek cynic and satirist. These labels are more of a classical framework for literary critics rather than a strict set of guidelines that all modern satires must follow, but they are worth reviewing because they can help make clear the wide variety of forms that satire can take.Satire--Literary art of diminishing a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking toward it attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn or indignation.

Takes its form from the genre it spoofs. Horatian satire--After the Roman satirist Horace: Satire in which the voice is indulgent, tolerant, amused, and witty. The speaker holds up to gentle ridicule the absurdities and follies of human beings, aiming at producing in . Juvenalian and horatian Satire |Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind of reception it meets in the world, and that so very few are offended with it.X Jonathan Swift (), Anglo-Irish.

Horatian Satire is lighthearted and gentle. It is the type of satire that is supposed to evoke a smile. Juvenalian Satire, on the other hand, is .

Literature What does impertinent mean I'm supposed to write a comparison of Hektor and Achilles from Homer's The Iliad, but I don't know where to start. What's the difference between parody and satire? Lord of the Flies uses the word inimical.

What does it . Juvenalian satire, named for the writings of the Roman satirist Juvenal (late first century – early second century AD), is more contemptuous and abrasive than the Horatian.

Juvenal disagreed with the opinions of the public figures and institutions of the Republic and actively attacked them through his literature.

Satire in Literature: Definition, Types & Examples. Horatian satire and Juvenalian satire are the two most common forms of satire. Horatian satire is less harsh and takes a comical view at.

Satire - Definition and Examples | LitCharts